More hats and a scarf

Back when I started knitting again, I went on a bit of a hat-making frenzy – partly because hats are quick projects, partly because Ickle Baby Cthulhu was fast growing out of the many hats we had – indeed, many never fitted in the first place. I don’t want to sound like my SIL, but IBC’s head is HUGE! Thank God for c-sections. He’s not even 2 yet and all his little sunhats this summer were age 6 sized. Otherwise he is but a sturdy 12 to 23-month size.

The first ever hat I made for him was Lion Brand’s free pattern Strawberry Patch Cap. I did check most carefully for equivalent-sized yarn – Lion Brand is not to be found here – but I did not do a swatch, haha! I rarely do, naughty me. I do try to match up the right needle-to-yarn size unless I’m going for a particular effect, but it’s easier to knit a bit of the pattern, see how it’s going size-wise, then frog if necessary and knit a different size given in the pattern (assuming I’m actually following it that religiously) – so if my 36in chest size sweater is coming up a 40in, I knit up the 32in size instead. Easier than faffing about with gauges. Obviously the 32in pattern is going to be shorter, but I always measure it off on the wearer rather than rely on the pattern – on the few occasions when I’ve done swatches, if I got the stitch-gauge right the row-gauge would be skew-wheef. Elizabeth Zimmerman recommends ignoring row-gauges and measuring your work for the intended wearer as you knit, and who am I to argue with someone who made a living knitting?

I used red and green acrylic DK from a pound shop. It was soooo sweet, though TH disapproved.

The next one was a Knitty pattern called Baby Tart. As I had green DK left over from the Strawberry Patch Cap, I did the “pie” bit in green, and used some black DK for the “filling”, as sepals and berry. I call it the Blackberry Cap, or the Blackberet, hnurh, hnurgh, hnurh. I had real bother with the pattern for the bobbled berry filling – maybe it was having to look in 3 different places to work it, but it didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me. Not one I’ll be repeating, I think. TH again not appreciative of my artistry, and IBC ungratefully had a growth spurt before it was done.didn’t approve – it’s okay for IBC to wear a leopardskin fun-fur hat with horns, made by one of TH’s friends, but wearing a hat made by his mummy might give him a complex, it seems. Or wearing a cute and eminently suitable sailor suit to a wedding. Bah. Sadly, IBC tipped it out of his pram and it’s never been seen since, so this is the only evidence of its existence. Quite Tyrolean I thought.

 

I also crocheted the Pompom Hat from Craftown, in black DK with a red stripe around the hatband. However, after a couple of tries I abandoned the pattern and constructed it by measuring off IBC.

 

 

 

Last October I started working at the school, leaving IBC with a childminder during the day. This entails wheeling him across an exposed and windy area in less than clement weather twice a day. Anorak hoods wouldn’t stay on, and throwing hats out of the buggy was tremendously entertaining, so I hit on the idea of making a balaclava. After quite a search I found a straightforward one on knitlist. Naturally I made it up in basketweave stitch rather than the stitch pattern recommended, just to be awkward. It was amazingly easy to make up, and IBC can’t whip it off – result!

 

 

 

It left a bit much of his face exposed, and, since I had some black and green DK left, I made a second one. This I made a bit longer in the head, and with longer ribbing round the face. Also when I picked up the stitches for the ribbing round the front, I used the same short-rowing technique for the top flap of the balaclava to build up the ‘chin’ section to cover his mouth and nose. The ribbing kept this piece elastic enough to pull down if it wasn’t too cold, which was an unplanned bonus. The black and green pattern was supposed to look like dragon scales, but this was not so successful… TH attempted some dry wit by suggesting I knit him an armalite to go with it.

I’ve since made a purple version, with purple ostrich fancy yarn twisted along with the yarn for the ribbing round the face only, for a little girl his childminder also looks after – her favourite colour, and she and her mum loved it. No photos though. The ostrich yarn fluffed out really nicely, like the furry bits on the hoods of those snorkel anoraks all the kids used to wear when I was young. Er. Definitely -er.

So to the scarf. Made in beige (MC) and turquoise (Contrast) ostrich yarn for the ex-manager of the Hub Hazelwell when she left for her new job. Quite simple, just with a hole in the middle about a third of the way along, done by just knitting up the first half of the stitches to the desired length, breaking off the yarn and rejoining it to the remaining stitches, knit up to the same length, then just knit across all stitches as normal to the end. You don’t even need to put the non-worked stitches on a stitch-holder, just leave them on the needle. In fact you could be making trouble for yourself, transferring ostrich yarn onto and off stitch-holders. Don’t do it. Mommy says so.

 

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